The Bubble Lounge

Celebrating 250 Episodes of the Bubble Lounge with Steve Noviello!

May 09, 2024 Martha Jackson & Nellie Sciutto Season 7 Episode 19
Celebrating 250 Episodes of the Bubble Lounge with Steve Noviello!
The Bubble Lounge
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The Bubble Lounge
Celebrating 250 Episodes of the Bubble Lounge with Steve Noviello!
May 09, 2024 Season 7 Episode 19
Martha Jackson & Nellie Sciutto

We’re celebrating our 250th podcast episode and Park Cities dad and 11-time Emmy Award-winning journalist, Steve Noviello is taking over The Bubble Lounge! 

We had a great time reflecting back on the past 5 1/2 years with Steve and can’t wait to share the fun with you. We celebrate the child-centric focus that defines our local community, while  highlighting the impact of school events, the dedication of Park Cities parents, and the wisdom gleaned from contentious school board elections. The Bubble Lounge has become known for shedding light on the family-oriented vibrancy of our community and the shared commitment to nurturing a prosperous future for our children.

We also look back on some of our most memorable moments and dreamed up future ones, including musings about interviewing Dallas' own George and Laura Bush. Join us to discover the quirks of our neighborhood, the warmth of its residents, and the rapid-fire relevance of our content that keeps you connected to the pulse of this unique place we all call home.

This episode sponsored by Tequila Komos, Kathy L Wall State Farm Agency, and SA Oral Surgeons. To learn more about our sponsors visit Tequila Komos, Kathy L Wall State Farm Agency and SA Oral Surgeons

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

We’re celebrating our 250th podcast episode and Park Cities dad and 11-time Emmy Award-winning journalist, Steve Noviello is taking over The Bubble Lounge! 

We had a great time reflecting back on the past 5 1/2 years with Steve and can’t wait to share the fun with you. We celebrate the child-centric focus that defines our local community, while  highlighting the impact of school events, the dedication of Park Cities parents, and the wisdom gleaned from contentious school board elections. The Bubble Lounge has become known for shedding light on the family-oriented vibrancy of our community and the shared commitment to nurturing a prosperous future for our children.

We also look back on some of our most memorable moments and dreamed up future ones, including musings about interviewing Dallas' own George and Laura Bush. Join us to discover the quirks of our neighborhood, the warmth of its residents, and the rapid-fire relevance of our content that keeps you connected to the pulse of this unique place we all call home.

This episode sponsored by Tequila Komos, Kathy L Wall State Farm Agency, and SA Oral Surgeons. To learn more about our sponsors visit Tequila Komos, Kathy L Wall State Farm Agency and SA Oral Surgeons

Speaker 1:

This episode sponsored by Kathy L Wall State Farm Agency. Learn more at kathylwallcom. And Stuart Arango Oral Surgery. Learn more at saoralsurgeonscom. And Tequila Comos luxury tequila refined. Ask for it by name at Pogo, spex or your favorite liquor store.

Speaker 2:

Welcome to the Bubble Lounge for a very special 250th episode. I'm Steve Noviello. Today we are turning the tables. So, martha and Nellie, welcome to your own show. Am I the first guest host? Yes, yes, to turn around. Look at that. All right, so it's a big day indeed. So, first up, let me just get this out of the way. Thank you for having me. Second, thank you for doing what you do. I am a fellow Park City's resident and I am a big fan of the podcast. I think it's so neat 250 episodes in. So take our listeners back to the beginning. Whose idea was this?

Speaker 3:

Okay, I have to tell the story, but it was Martha's idea. So we live on the same street and Martha and Sean walked up to my driveway and said hey, we had a question for you. You know you've been in this industry for a long time. Would you be interested in doing a podcast with us about our neighborhood? And and I thought it was a great idea. So it was Martha's idea and she'd always wanted to do this. She studied journalism in college and this was her her thing thing and I was happy to jump in.

Speaker 2:

The cool thing about it, I think that people generally have ideas and think, okay, how can we make this big? And what I think has been the secret sauce for you guys, at least from a listener perspective, is how can we keep this small? It's so intimate, I mean, it's like a micro podcast about a very specific place and a very specific audience, and I think that's why it works so well, do you?

Speaker 1:

I absolutely do. I mean, if you got any bigger or expanded out, it just wouldn't be as intimate as it is. And I mean this community is so unique and special, like what you're saying, and it's very tight knit and everyone knows each other and it just works because we're constantly shining a light on other neighbors.

Speaker 3:

For sure, and there's a different perspective. I always said this in the beginning, when we started, which is, I feel like we came to this neighborhood differently. Like Martha always wanted to live here, I had never heard of this neighborhood. I moved from Los Angeles and I didn't want to move to Texas, and then I immediately loved it. So we come from different points of view and I think that helps as well.

Speaker 2:

So one of the things that I have to say. So, listen, I've been in Texas, for in Dallas specifically, for about 21 years now. Never in a million years did I think that this would be what I'm a New Yorker I thought for sure I would go back up to the northeast, and there's a lot of folklore that goes with living in the Park Cities. I certainly never pictured myself as a Park Cities resident, but one of the things that I think that you guys do so well is you kind of pull back the curtain to the very essence of why the Park City's works so well and why people love it. I mean, where else can you go to see local coverage of a middle school play?

Speaker 1:

Right, well, I just think one of my big reasons for doing the podcast is I wanted to try to help change people's perception is because there's a perception out there that everyone that lives here is a rich douchebag. No, you guys are rich, we are rich douchebags, and that's why we started this, and that absolutely is not true.

Speaker 1:

I feel like there's more good people that are out there doing really great things. They're giving their time, and maybe they are rich. They're giving their money to do better with it, though, and I feel like when something really happens in this community, we all come together, like, for example, a family that just lost their little girl in the car accident. The outpouring of love and support and the pink ribbons all over the neighborhood and the memorial service were just so touching to see everyone to come together like that.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it really is a truly special place. The one thing that I also find very interesting and maybe this is just my overall impression, but your podcast focuses on the same thing that I think all the residents focus on, and that's generally the kids who live in this neighborhood. I mean, you're at the football games, you're at the school plays, you're at the Highland Bell stuff. I mean, was that intentional when you first went into this? To think, okay, I mean, we in the TV business say listen, you want people to watch, put their kids on TV.

Speaker 3:

They'll tune in right.

Speaker 2:

Was that intentional for you?

Speaker 1:

guys? Yes, absolutely. I mean, after we did, you know, a certain amount of episodes, it became clear that the children is what people love to hear about. Parents love to see them on our Instagram. The kids love to see each other and it was definitely a huge part of just kind of changing a little bit and focusing more on the kids.

Speaker 3:

Well, and I think a niche audience is important when it comes to a podcast, and it very much is a niche, and not only is it about the kids, but it's also about what their parents do local businesses, the businesses that these kids go to, and you know where they spend their money, where they spend their time.

Speaker 2:

Well, and I think that at the end of the day, I know for us I mean my husband and I would never have considered living in the Park Cities if we didn't have kids. I mean, we live here because of our children and because of the excellent public schools, and that's something that we wanted to be a part of. And I'll tell you in the four or five years that we've been here now, particularly now that we're involved in the public schools, kind of that folklore of what these people would be like is totally gone. I mean, it's so impressive to me to see that excellence is measured in how involved you are in your kids' life, how involved you are in volunteering at the local school, how involved you are in making the community a better place for everybody to live. And you guys have really become, I mean, 250 episodes in a very vital part of that. What void do you think you've filled successfully?

Speaker 3:

Well, I think we said it. I think it is about highlighting things that matter to the people in the neighborhood. Right, I mean, it really is. And you grew up in New York City.

Speaker 3:

I don't know if you grew up in a bubble like I did but I grew up in a bubble on the Upper East Side and I'm proud of growing up in a bubble and I loved living in that bubble because I felt like I was in this big city which we are here in Dallas as well. But I also was protected by my little neighborhood and felt like I really belonged and I was a part of a community and that community is so strong here.

Speaker 2:

The thing that I also enjoy about the podcast, I have to say, is that it I mean every now and again, but generally the stuff that you're covering is stuff that is accessible to everybody. It's not like oh, here we are at Hermes today.

Speaker 1:

I'm buying a new Birkin bag. See, that goes back to what I was saying. That's how people think the women in this neighborhood spend their time, but that is not true at all. I have a couple of friends who are stylists at Halliburton Village.

Speaker 2:

It does happen. It does happen. It does exist, you have to buy a bunch of stuff, to even be allowed to buy the Birkin but yes, yeah no, it's great because it's like, hey, go to this restaurant, here's this family who opened up a business, or here's you know something terrible that happened, or something wonderful that happened.

Speaker 3:

Well, and you know what's interesting is, we went through COVID on this podcast and I actually think that that was beneficial in a lot of ways, because people were home and they were listening and we were addressing those issues and everything that went along with that.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it's really. It was a kind of vital time to be connected. We had the same thing in my business where it was like, listen, we just need to get down to like brass tacks here and help people function day to day because it was such an unprecedented time. Was that a particularly challenging for you guys? I know for us it was more like gosh.

Speaker 1:

Now there's an abundance of things for us to talk about, even though it was kind of terrible, Well, it was, like you said, a very interesting time and I had the bright idea because I felt like you know, we're not doing anything else, we can do it three times a week. Well, nellie's still doing her thing long distance and she's got plenty of things filling her time so we cut that down eventually.

Speaker 1:

But yeah, we were trying to kind of make light of a serious situation and provide some laughs and some humor about it. Tell people where to buy their toilet paper.

Speaker 3:

We did. We did, we said go to the Costco business store.

Speaker 2:

And not only was it was COVID, it was a very contentious school board election season. And you guys were in the thick of it.

Speaker 3:

I mean, you hosted, I was like look at these two getting political on everybody You're like let's host the candidates.

Speaker 2:

But again, what a great service to people who live in this neighborhood Because, quite frankly, the people in Preston Hollow don't care who's on our school board.

Speaker 1:

right, that is so true, yeah, we try to stay away from politics as a whole. We'll make an exception for the school board elections and I think it just a lot of people are, especially in the most recent years it's gotten pretty heated. They're kind of scared to have those forums in person. So we did them on Zoom. So nobody's all together, so there's not that friction, but we still you still get to see the candidates face and hear their reactions to the questions, but next week we're having Trump and Biden on.

Speaker 2:

So I was going to say I'm on chatter, there's friction. We don't all have to be in the same room.

Speaker 1:

There always is during an election year it gets kind of ugly. You do get to see the darker side to the person. Yeah for sure.

Speaker 2:

Okay, so 250 episodes ago it began, which is kind of crazy to think that you've amassed so many. We say at our podcast that we do it's like okay. Once you get on this treadmill, you can't stop.

Speaker 1:

I mean it's like okay once you get on this treadmill, you can't stop. I mean, it's like over and over and, over and over again. So for the content that you have, where do you mine for your ideas? Just everywhere. We work with PR firms that love to have their clients on. You just run into somebody at their grocery store and they give you a lead People email through the website, people DM on Instagram, just anywhere and everywhere. I am constantly looking at the paper and on park city's chatter just to see what people are, what's kind of the hot topics, and go from there.

Speaker 3:

Well, and we're both media junkies, so we're always we're always listening to what's going on and, you know, have our finger on the pulse about things and we also are very involved. So I mean, mean, you'll catch Martha out at a restaurant in Snyder Plaza or me going to an event, etc. Like we really like to be a part of the community and we like to be out and about, don't you think?

Speaker 1:

Oh, absolutely. Just yesterday I was waiting in line to upgrade my football tickets and I met these two very nice dads and they had heard of the podcast and they were very complimentary and it just it's fun to be out and about and see people and just get their feedback.

Speaker 2:

I have still not made it to a Friday night.

Speaker 3:

I know you told me that I've got to go Like I mean, that's just not something that I grew up with.

Speaker 2:

We just didn't have that where I'm from.

Speaker 3:

Right.

Speaker 2:

And, like I, I see frankly through the video on your Instagram page, um of the it's like living in a movie.

Speaker 2:

I mean the bells are there and the spirit squad or whatever they're called, the Scotsman I mean, and that's. I think that that's one of the kind of things that really works so well for you guys is that you're not sitting in a room talking about the neighborhood. You're bringing us to the places, You're attending the school plays, You're attending the Friday night, you know you're attending the tree lighting, You're attending the fishing Derby or whatever. Whatever the case, you know, maybe that's that's a lot of running around.

Speaker 3:

Well, I have my. My sisters always tease me. They're like if you say the word Snyder Plaza five times in a sentence, I can't listen to it. They should be. I hear they have new parking coming or something.

Speaker 1:

Something's going on over there. There's all kinds of new stuff going on. The construction started this week and people are in an uproar already. It's going to be a very long, 18 months.

Speaker 2:

What's the tea? Why? Because it's so disruptive.

Speaker 1:

Well, yes, because they're going to have to reroute and drive in a different way. I think that Tom Thumb is going to only have one entrance coming in and coming out.

Speaker 3:

And there were parking issues already. We don't like change in this neighborhood.

Speaker 2:

That's true, and there were parking issues to begin with, so now forget about it.

Speaker 1:

Like there's, you know, a do not cross sign already up near Foxtrot market where it was what has surprised you the most about doing the show. Just, it took probably about two years before anybody would say anything in person. It was kind of weird, like if we didn't have reports that showed us that people were listening, I would have given up really early on.

Speaker 1:

But as it's evolved, people have gotten more comfortable with podcasts. A lot of people didn't even know what a podcast was when we started, and I love it when they tell us we tried a restaurant or we did this event or did whatever you guys were talking about and we loved it Like we love hearing that kind of feedback.

Speaker 3:

Well, what surprised me the most are the guests that we have. We love hearing that kind of feedback. Well, and what surprised me the most are the guests that we have. I feel like one of the best parts of our podcast is we highlight the other people, not ourselves, and I think that's what it's about, right? And it surprised me how interesting, dynamic and exciting everybody is in the neighborhood. There's so many great stories to be told and to hear.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I think that everybody definitely has a story to tell, stories to be told and to hear. Yeah, I think that everybody definitely has a story to tell. I mean, if I'm ever, you know, out at a story covering you know whatever, and the person I'm interviewing will say to me hey, do you want to see my garage? It's like one of two things is about to happen. You're about to, like, show me that you've got the paper boy on a slow boil on a stove, or you, like, build Victorian birdhouses out of matchsticks. Luckily, it's generally the second of those two things. I haven't encountered the first one yet, but you're exactly right. And I think that people love talking about themselves and they love sharing their story, and to be the person that facilitates allowing them to do that is a really awesome responsibility.

Speaker 3:

Well, we knew we had made it when the Chicago sisters moved to town and they learned everything about the neighborhood. They were like our crazy fans. Right, they were awesome.

Speaker 1:

There's these two sisters from Chicago that, during COVID, decided they wanted to move and they found our podcast just by Googling Highland Park Podcast and because of listening to it they decided to come here. They put their kids into Shelton which is where Nellie's kids went, or her son went, rather and they were on the show and they were just like our biggest fans and the thought that because of our podcast, we actually were the reason people moved here is pretty cool.

Speaker 2:

Well, you rerouted the trajectory of their life essentially right.

Speaker 3:

I mean it's like hey, this is where they go.

Speaker 2:

So I'm assuming you got 25% from the real estate commission, from them buying a house, absolutely.

Speaker 3:

I that was should be a sponsor as well. Oh my gosh, You're totally right about that we're going to get right on that, Steve.

Speaker 1:

I'm telling you, I'm telling you.

Speaker 2:

So I did want to ask you something. From earlier in the show you said that you had never even considered moving to Highland Park, or I never heard of it. What moved the needle for you?

Speaker 3:

My, my husband's job. My husband has a company that's based out of Dallas and we tried commuting for a little while and then I said I'd give him two years here. I said I'll do my time for two years and then my son and I moved back to LA and I realized I missed it and I missed my husband too, because he was flying in on weekends and it was just too crazy to try to maintain. And a friend of ours had a party, a going away party for us, and she put cows in the front yard and said until the cows come home, and I just remember that vision in my head and being like I really miss the neighborhood. And again, I grew up in a bubble, so I enjoy being in a bubble because I know living here we have access to everything that a big city offers, but we also have that community.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, for sure, you know. For us we were kind of looking and we didn't know anything about zones or elementary schools. We just needed to find a house we could afford, where the street signs were blue or said UP and we knew that we were in the right place and we were driving through and there were these kids. I think it was up by Gore Park, maybe like walking on a Saturday morning, like with their fishing poles and like a bucket and I was like, it was like that movie, Funny Farm.

Speaker 3:

I don't know if you've ever seen it where they're like release the deer.

Speaker 2:

I was like you have got to be kidding me that these kids are going fishing on a Saturday morning. It's seared into my memory.

Speaker 3:

And not only that, I don't know what the term is. They stuff the pond with fish for the kids. Yes, they stock the pond, thank you, they stuff it.

Speaker 2:

They just stuff it, which is stock, thank you, they stuff it, they just stuff it and, frankly, even at a more basic level, that it's a neighborhood in which children can still walk on their own on a Saturday morning to go do things like go fishing.

Speaker 3:

That's not something everybody gets to do. It is not or ride their bikes, because we were living in the Hollywood Hills and you cannot ride a bike gang riding around all the time. It was really fun.

Speaker 2:

I see that. I see that a lot, Of course. I also see a lot of people complaining about the now motorized bike gangs which I'm sure either will be or has been a topic on your podcast. What about for you? And I know that you had the experience. You grew up here, right, I grew up in Fort Worth.

Speaker 1:

So in Fort Worth I'll always remember that my dad had this extremely tight knit community. He played golf at Colonial Country Club, he was very active in the community and he just had this huge array of friends that he was always doing things with and I just always admired the tightness of his friend group that he had. And so I came all the way from Preston Hollow. I lived there for many years and I would drive through here and I would see just what you're describing these cute little families riding their bikes up to Snyder Plaza and just being out and about all the time, and I thought when I have kids, that's definitely where I want to be. I want some of that.

Speaker 2:

That's the experience. Yeah, I know. For us it's like it's so nice to be somewhere where we know we're settled. We are here through high school minimum and it's just nice to get to invest in that.

Speaker 3:

Well, and when you say minimum, it's interesting because I have the only child. We both have freshmen in college and that's all I have. So I'm an empty nester. Now we are empty nesters and we're not leaving.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, my husband thinks we're leaving after our youngest graduate from high school but then I'll kick in with the don't you want them to come home?

Speaker 3:

to their family. That's exactly what it is Sleep in their room. You've got a long ways to go, too, thank God.

Speaker 2:

I'm in no rush, Okay. So, looking back over 250 episodes, are there any that kind of stand out as particularly crazy or particularly difficult to cover? Or just so much what? What annual traditions that you guys cover?

Speaker 1:

My favorite one. I always say this is when we interviewed Tracy Walder, who is a mom in the neighborhood that was a former FBI and CIA agent. I mean just the thought of talking to a mom and she looks like all of us, you know. She looks like you're a park city's mom and that has this background. Now she can't tell you all the information. We'd love to know more, but I was just hanging on every word she had. It was just a very fascinating experience to talk to her. That's interesting.

Speaker 3:

Well, and I like covering events. I think it's really fun to cover events and see all of our neighbors out and talk to them and interview them on the red carpet. I think that's really fun.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, that has to be one of my favorite parts about living here, and again, now that we're in the schools, it gets punctuated even more so. Hey, there's a tree lighting, but first there's a block party. I mean, everybody is so generous with their time and their homes and kind of just having this shared experience that again, I think the two of you really add a whole lot of quality to who would you love to have that you haven't had yet? George Bush.

Speaker 3:

I think so too, right, yes, yes, because we used to do the podcast in Sean's previous office, which was where his office was, and they were so friendly, so we think they'd be a good guest, him and Laura. I think so too.

Speaker 2:

Have you had Laura on?

Speaker 3:

No, do you have any connections.

Speaker 1:

Well, so am I.

Speaker 2:

I was a docent at the ABPA house thing.

Speaker 1:

Oh great, oh cool.

Speaker 2:

Now I will say I was also the only dad, so everyone thought I was the designer of the house.

Speaker 3:

So you just pretended I was the only male volunteer.

Speaker 2:

But it was the president this year of the PTA. It was her mom's house.

Speaker 3:

And.

Speaker 2:

There she was and I was like I mean, talk about like a Park City's moment, right? Yes, first it was like the temperature of the room kind of shifted and the energy shifted, and then the men in dark suits came in.

Speaker 3:

You're like what?

Speaker 1:

is going on here.

Speaker 3:

And then there was Laura.

Speaker 2:

So I feel like she would be a great guest I think she would be a great guest.

Speaker 1:

Yes, I agree, both of those Scotty Shuffler would be really amazing.

Speaker 2:

I mean he is on fire. I'm surprised that he hasn't been here. You certainly covered him when he was making his way out of here.

Speaker 1:

Yes, yes, we would love to have him on. I don't know if I have a connection that could get to him, and most of those celebrity types kind of ignore the.

Speaker 3:

DMs For sure. Yeah, you can go the Royal Oaks route.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I'm going to get murdered here for not knowing this but who's the football player that graduated from Highland Park? He wasn't even a quarterback on the Super Bowl team recently.

Speaker 1:

Matthew Stafford Stafford. Yes, I knew it was another S last name. I was doing videos for the Highland Bells that year that he retired his jersey and so I was like right there by him and I got a really good video of him walking by. But I asked too late if I could interview him and they said no, okay.

Speaker 2:

So let me ask you this, speaking of kind of seeing people out in their natural habitat and listen, we're all people but do you get nervous, like where? You're like, oh, I want to talk to you, but I'm a little afraid to talk to you. And then you start thinking, well, I just have a podcast. It's not like it's know, whatever. I do do you? Yes, I do. Who? Can you give me an example of anybody that happened with?

Speaker 1:

Caitlyn Jenner, who is not a. Park City person. I was gonna say where did you see her? At a charity event? Nellie had been asked to cover it and she wasn't able to go, so she turned it over to me and they gave me full access to everybody that was there, and Caitlyn was presenting a ward that night and so, yeah, I was a nervous wreck, like I was about to cry. I was so nervous to go up and talk.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, Well, and also I feel like Caitlyn Jenner has this like aura about her that like I mean, it's like looking into the sun, right, and I like in, like, just you're like you know like it's you know like she's one of these people that is very, you know, recognizable and probably, in your mind, recognizable in a totally different format as well, based on how old we all are, right, yes. So I'm sure that that also adds to the oh my God, did Steve just call us old? I said how old we all are.

Speaker 3:

It's not 250,000 podcasts.

Speaker 1:

He tried to include himself in that? No it was strange because I was at a conference in California many years ago and she was there as Bruce Jenner, so I've seen both sides of the coin, and so it was interesting.

Speaker 3:

Okay, what about you? No, just because I've been doing this for 35 years.

Speaker 2:

Your experience- is different right.

Speaker 3:

I just enjoy it. I think you get used to rejection in our business.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, for sure.

Speaker 3:

If I ask somebody and they said no, I'd be like okay.

Speaker 2:

What would you ask President Bush? What do you want to know?

Speaker 3:

I think Laura's the conduit right Because she's a mom here's what I would ask why don't you live in park cities?

Speaker 1:

Why do you live over there in Preston Hall? Do you think it was a security thing? I mean, I guess, unless you're maybe on.

Speaker 2:

Fairfax. But even then, even the cul-de-sac side backs up to the park and you'd have to close that side off too, and I think it's more of a like there's not a street we could put you on without, totally because they're in a cul-de-sac in Preston.

Speaker 1:

Hall right, it's gated now right, so maybe that's why Is it a pretty big estate? I don't even know where you live.

Speaker 3:

Yes, because my friends live right behind them.

Speaker 1:

Okay, and.

Speaker 3:

I have a funny story about George Bush, Like he walks his dog and my friend Greg their dogs are friends always complaining.

Speaker 2:

He gets really annoyed, that um w is always like hey, my dog wants to play with your dog and he's like I'm busy, george, not today, george, that's funny, my husband just saw him recently speaking at some conference or whatever, and he was like george bush is the funniest yeah, he's so he is humble and a little self-deprecating, which I guess after the fact is much easier to do.

Speaker 3:

But I never hear anything but great things about him. Ever Like a friendly neighborhood guy.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, like walking his dog, yes, being like, hey, I want to hang out with you. As opposed to you would think that he'd be the kind who's like well, you can come to me, I'm George W Bush.

Speaker 3:

I think Martha should stand outside with her dogs and like get the dogs to be friends with the dog Was the show around during the presidential library opening, or does that predate you?

Speaker 1:

Predates yeah, Definitely predates. That would have been a good time. That would have been really good.

Speaker 2:

Surely there's an anniversary coming up we can call the PR people.

Speaker 1:

That's a good idea. Yeah, we need to make that happen. I mean, he's right here, he's right here.

Speaker 2:

Okay For people. Let's imagine that people are listening kind of for the first time here. What's the one thing that you want them to know about this particular podcast and why they should listen?

Speaker 3:

Because there is a lot of competition. Well, I think the thing that I want people to know is that it's really where you get your information about kids, local businesses, restaurants, happenings in the neighborhood, disasters, you know when there's a tornado or when there's COVID, et cetera. I think we provide a lot of really local news that people want to hear about. Like I know, when I travel for work and I'm shooting a movie or something, I always go straight to local news. And I feel like this is a form of local news.

Speaker 1:

Yeah for sure, yeah for sure. But what I think is really cool is we're able to react quickly if something is going on. We don't have print deadlines that hold us back. You know magazines have a two month delay typically before you see the news show up in the magazines. And I mean all avenues are great and you need to hear the information multiple times so you remember it. But I think it's pretty neat that we're able to react quickly.

Speaker 2:

Well, because listen, at the end of the day, these days no longer do people need, you know, the facility of a television studio or the facility of a radio station. I mean you can grab your mics or your iPhone and boom. I mean it's really the speed of information is almost, you know, instantaneous. And because you live here and are part of the community and kind of anticipate the things that are going on, I think that really kind of puts you miles ahead of anybody else who could do it.

Speaker 3:

I like you saying anticipate what's going on, because that's a good word. Yeah, that's true.

Speaker 2:

No, trust me Again, I'm not blowing smoke here. I've listened to your podcast and I will often be like, okay, well, what can I do with my kids this weekend? Because I got nothing.

Speaker 3:

And here's what's going on. I just want to say this for my sisters you can go to Snyder Plaza.

Speaker 2:

Well, I hear the parking's terrible, so I'm not getting any better anytime soon. Okay, so 250 in. Where are we in the next 250? What do you think? Oh goodness.

Speaker 1:

Wow, there's just always. I have a very long ongoing list and then new stuff pops up. It's just so many different topics and people that we want to talk to.

Speaker 3:

out there, there's a never ending well of what we can focus on.

Speaker 2:

Isn't that amazing? I mean, the Park City is about like two square miles, yes, but like there is a never ending well of stories you know in this neighborhood.

Speaker 3:

Well, there are, and you move to the neighborhood and you have young kids, right. So then we're going through that again with different people and their children, just like we did with our freshmen in college.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, there are many layers to the onion. Let's say about living in this neighborhood and again I have to say that we had a lot of hesitation about living in the park cities. We heard, oh gosh, oh gosh, you know, and it's been lovely. I mean, I'm a big defender of the bubble and often Chuck, I think we had helicopters flying over a couple of weeks ago and some man chatter was like what's?

Speaker 2:

going on with the helicopters and I jokingly said I think that there was a crack in the bubble and they're up there fixing it.

Speaker 1:

That is funny, oh my gosh, hilarious. We can't breathe. Exactly, that's an outside air, come on.

Speaker 3:

It's crazy.

Speaker 2:

Well, listen. I want to say thank you for having me. I think this has been super fun For folks again who might be hearing you for the first time. Where can they? How often can they listen? Where should they find you? What platforms are you on?

Speaker 1:

Yeah, we are on pretty much every platform you can listen to a podcast on. You can visit our website at BubbaLoungenet. Instagram is a really great place to go to at Bubba Lounge Podcast. Lots of extra videos there that you won't see on Facebook. There's just more information and more content on Instagram.

Speaker 3:

But, yeah, you can find us all sorts of places and I have to say it's been lovely having you interview us and I feel a little weird not asking you more questions.

Speaker 2:

Well, I mean 251,. Maybe I'm your guest.

Speaker 1:

That's true. I think we should, because I actually Maybe me and George together.

Speaker 2:

Yes, I feel like we have a lot to talk about.

Speaker 1:

Yes, well, yeah, if anyone has connections out there for George Bush and Laura.

Speaker 2:

We would love to hear from you, hey, and we love that you all tuned in today. And again, congratulations on number 250. Well done.

Speaker 1:

Thank you so much, thank you so much.

Behind the Park Cities Curtain
Neighborhood Podcast Focuses on Community Engagement
Neighborhood Memories and Favorite Guests
Local Podcast Discusses Park Cities Living