The Bubble Lounge

Solar Eclipse 2024 with Bridget Myers HPISD STEAM Lead

April 04, 2024 Martha Jackson & Nellie Sciutto Season 7 Episode 14
Solar Eclipse 2024 with Bridget Myers HPISD STEAM Lead
The Bubble Lounge
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The Bubble Lounge
Solar Eclipse 2024 with Bridget Myers HPISD STEAM Lead
Apr 04, 2024 Season 7 Episode 14
Martha Jackson & Nellie Sciutto

Everyone is talking about the upcoming Solar Eclipse on April 8th so we invited Bridget Myers, the STEAM Lead of Highland Park, to share everything you need for a stellar experience. We're dishing out essential eclipse preparations and safety tips so you can marvel at the midday darkness without a hitch. From the best viewing spots to handling the surge of visitors, we've got you covered!

This episode sponsored by Kathy L Wall State Farm Agency, and SA Oral Surgeons. To learn more about our sponsors visit Kathy L Wall State Farm Agency and SA Oral Surgeons

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Everyone is talking about the upcoming Solar Eclipse on April 8th so we invited Bridget Myers, the STEAM Lead of Highland Park, to share everything you need for a stellar experience. We're dishing out essential eclipse preparations and safety tips so you can marvel at the midday darkness without a hitch. From the best viewing spots to handling the surge of visitors, we've got you covered!

This episode sponsored by Kathy L Wall State Farm Agency, and SA Oral Surgeons. To learn more about our sponsors visit Kathy L Wall State Farm Agency and SA Oral Surgeons

Speaker 1:

This episode sponsored by Kathy L Wall State Farm Agency. Learn more at kathylwallcom. And Tequila Comos luxury tequila refined Ask for it by name at Pogo, spex or your favorite liquor store. And Stewart Arango Oral Surgery Learn more at saoralsurgeonscom. Welcome to the Bubble Lounge. I'm Nellie.

Speaker 2:

Sciutto.

Speaker 1:

And I'm Martha Jackson, and today we are all about the eclipse that's coming up on Monday.

Speaker 2:

Which is so exciting because there's so many benefits to living in Dallas, but one of the biggest ones is we're right in the path of the eclipse coming on Monday.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, we didn't see that coming did we?

Speaker 2:

No, we did not when we moved here.

Speaker 1:

No, it's true, Like we. So lucky because, like you were saying before, we started recording that there's an estimated 2 million people coming to this area to come and watch it and we don't have to go anywhere.

Speaker 2:

No, and I just said I'm telling everybody get your gas, get ready, because 2 million people are descending upon our city. So you might want to be prepared a little bit.

Speaker 1:

I think that that is really good advice, and my advice would be, if you can, stay off the roads, especially the highways, because it's my understanding that people that are on the highways are literally going to just stop and sit there and watch it. Oh well, we're lucky, we don't have to do that. I know, I know, I'm trying to figure out where my spot's going to be to watch it. So what are you planning to do?

Speaker 2:

Well, I'm thinking of going to our country club, because Royal Oaks has a roof area that we can go to, so I'm thinking about doing that.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I think that's a really good idea.

Speaker 2:

I mean, I think the idea is be in a higher spot right, or a spot with no trees, as we're going to discover when we talk to our guest today.

Speaker 1:

That's right. Today we have the STEAM lead of Highland Park, Bridget Myers, joining us us and she is going to fill us in on everything that we need to know about the upcoming eclipse.

Speaker 2:

She's going to tell us all about safety with your eyes, as far as the eclipse goes, where to go to see the eclipse, what to expect, and we're so excited to have her on.

Speaker 1:

So you all are going to love this episode. I wanted to give a personal thank you to our good friend and show sponsor, kathy Elwall State Farm Agency. We have known Kathy for more than 15 years and there is no person we trust more when it comes to insurance than Kathy L Wall. Kathy is always available to help you find the right insurance for your family needs, whether it's covering your home auto or providing a life insurance policy tailored to the unique needs of families in Highland Park. My family trusts Kathy with our insurance and we hope you will too. Please visit kathylwaldcom to learn more and let her know that Martha from the Bubble Lounge sent you Bridget welcome to the show.

Speaker 2:

Hey, thanks. So tell us a little bit about your background.

Speaker 3:

Okay, so currently I am the STEAM lead for Highland Park, so science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics and so I travel from campus to campus and help develop lesson plans, help our teachers. I have some programs that we run like science fair, and then most recently we've been planning for the upcoming eclipse.

Speaker 1:

I think the whole world is planning for the upcoming eclipse. I mean, it's all you hear about everywhere you go, like we're so excited for Monday, but understand that the weather might not be cooperating with us.

Speaker 3:

I've been keeping a very, very sharp eye on the weather. Yeah, that's a little disappointing, I think. Either way, whether or not we should be able to experience something pretty incredible.

Speaker 2:

Is that true? So tell us what? Let's pretend it's a rainy, horrible day, okay. Okay, how will we experience it? Knock on wood. I'm just saying the worst case scenario. I'm not saying that's going to happen.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, so, and that is I think it's 30% right now that it's going to be raining, um.

Speaker 3:

and so what you should experience is totality is going to hit in Dallas, starting at one 40 and up until one 40,. Starting at 1232, I think we're going to start having the sun, um, being blocked out by the moon, and so 1240,. Starting at 12.32, I think we're going to start having the sun being blocked out by the moon, and so 12.40,. You go look with your eclipse glasses. You don't see anything but an orange bulb that looks like it has a tiny chunk taken out of it.

Speaker 3:

And the closer you get to totality, the more the moon blocks out the sun, the darker it's going to get. So what I've kind of gathered is 15 minutes before totality, so that's 125. It's going to very drastically start to get darker, so I would kind of say like very accelerated dusk, and so from 125 to 140, if it's clear, you would see almost like a sunset around the moon, and then at 140, it'll be like lights out. Um, there was an astronomer who told me it will be the same kind of darkness as if there's a full moon outside. So from 140 to 144, darkness, and then at 144 you'll get almost like a sunrise, accelerated for 15 minutes yeah, well, before we get into the rest of the details, because we've got a lot to cover.

Speaker 1:

I've seen a lot of questions out there from parents at HPISD wondering if it's a school holiday. If it's not, what are kids going to?

Speaker 2:

be doing.

Speaker 1:

Are poor kids going to get to experience this eclipse? I hope the weather yes.

Speaker 3:

Every kid. There's a plan on every campus elementary, middle, high school, intermediate to go outside. So the plan right now is to go outside To go to school.

Speaker 1:

To go to school. It is not a holiday, people. It's not a holiday people. No, no, no. And glasses will be provided. Right, we already have them, you do not need to worry about that.

Speaker 3:

Yes, we have glasses. Every campus has enough glasses. Yes, we have classes. Every campus has enough classes. They're working on getting them to classroom teachers now, and every campus has a plan and we're also now working on our backup plans, right, and so we have something in the works for them to experience and we have programming for them to do in the morning, and so it's not just going outside for whatever amount of time it is. I think most campuses at 110 to 120 are going out and coming back in around two, and I think the littlers aren't out quite as long, but they have an educational activity that they can do before that also that's related to the eclipse Is that what you're saying, okay.

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

I was really curious about that because I knew you would tie in education somehow with everything. So what kind of lessons should the kids expect?

Speaker 3:

to get. Okay. So at our elementary campuses we developed like a primer packet and so it's different for every two grades. So kinder and first, it's the same, second and third, third and fourth, kind of every couple, and they're going to be learning about what shadows are, because the big the teaks tie in that what Texas educationalas educational standards is to understand the movement of the sun, the moon and the earth and then to understand shadows. And so at your very low level, it's understanding, um, why we experience an eclipse, which is just a shadow of the moon on the earth, and um, and so going from there, and they have these little things to work on with their classroom teachers.

Speaker 2:

I feel like I need to be with the littles to learn about this. I do, too, because, honestly, I was just about to ask you how rare is this eclipse?

Speaker 3:

It's pretty rare, so the last one was in Dallas in 1878. Eclipses aren't rare on a global scale you probably get three to five a year but because our earth is mostly water, a lot of times they fall where there aren't any people, and so the odds of it happening in Dallas again isn't for another couple hundred years 2317 is the next one from what I read. Oh, you have the number it's 2317. I don't think I knew that.

Speaker 1:

So it's a once in a lifetime opportunity.

Speaker 3:

Oh, oh, it really is.

Speaker 2:

I mean, you'd have to travel to see it after this okay, but I saw something on the news that said it's the first one in 300 years. What does that mean? Did you hear anything about that? Like, is it very a unique one for some reason?

Speaker 3:

so for dallas specifically, that would be a true statement. Okay, the one in 2017 was um was happened, but it was like the opposite direction and so we weren't in the totality path but we saw a partial eclipse.

Speaker 1:

Okay, Now that was the one where you could see little tiny crescent moons all over the ground right. Yes, that was so cool.

Speaker 3:

I got some really cool pictures of that. Oh yeah, and that's what's going to happen from 1230 until 140. Oh yeah, and that's what's going to happen from 1230 until 140. Oh okay, you should be able to do that again. Okay cool, yeah, I saw some really cool things on Instagram people doing it with disco balls.

Speaker 2:

Oh, that's awesome. Yeah, you can like grab a disco ball and see like the reflections everywhere.

Speaker 3:

Get your disco balls out people.

Speaker 1:

I'm writing a note.

Speaker 2:

Because we all have disco balls in our house.

Speaker 1:

That's right, we should Party on.

Speaker 3:

But yeah, so it's pretty incredible and we should have something on every campus to lead up to it. Well, so they understand what it is to appreciate it.

Speaker 2:

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Speaker 3:

Oh yeah, and I'm worried about traffic that day.

Speaker 1:

Oh, I know, Me too. I don't want to be on the road at all.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I've been telling everyone I can't. If you can work from home that day, that is your day. Go have fun at home, but not if you're a teacher.

Speaker 2:

Unless you're a teacher at.

Speaker 3:

Highland Park. I'm so sorry, we did not cancel school.

Speaker 2:

So on the actual day will you be going to different schools?

Speaker 3:

My plan right now is to be at the high school. I have a couple interns, shout out to Calvin and Jake, and they have been helping us with everything on the AV side, and so the whole reason we've got a podcast set up and everything with the planetarium is a big credit to them, and so they are going to be running the graphics and a live camera from Highlander.

Speaker 1:

Oh, wow, yeah.

Speaker 3:

And so I will be with them, but every campus. I've personally been able to go and plan with every single campus, and they have an excellent plan.

Speaker 1:

Okay, can you give me a link and I'll share it for everyone? Yeah, absolutely, that's awesome, that's great. So how lucky are we to live in Dallas, texas, and be right in the path of totality? I mean, because the whole country isn't going to be able to see quite what we get to see.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I mean, the actual size of the shadow is 120 miles across the middle, which is pretty big and also not that big at the same time.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, exactly, in the scheme of things, the grand scheme.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, it's not very big, so it's pretty rare, and what's really special about this one is that it's on land for a really long portion, so it enters in Mexico and then comes north through Texas and goes all the way up through Canada, and so some of them like one of them was over the Bahamas or something which would be a great place to go see it.

Speaker 1:

Yes, let's go, but it's small.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, we should go for the next one if we miss this one because of rain.

Speaker 1:

Yeah.

Speaker 3:

But yeah, it should be pretty incredible. And then the sun is in its apex stage, so it's really extra bright, and then, you know, we can see the solar flares coming off of it and all that cool nerdy stuff.

Speaker 1:

Yes, the solar flares coming off of it and all that cool nerdy stuff. Yes, yes, Nerdy science stuff. Oh yeah, well, so I've read, above and beyond just a lot of traffic out there, that there could possibly be some strange things that happen. It sounds like more so with animals than anything else, but can you talk about any of that?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, so, because the nature is almost like an accelerated night, in the middle of the day you may notice animals acting really weird. If, like, there's owls or bats or possums, any nocturnal animals, they may come out during that or start chittering or being loud. The bugs probably. The same thing, right, crickets or grasshoppers or things that would normally chirp at night, and then I'm really interested in the street lamps. Same thing, right, crickets or grasshoppers or things that would normally chirp at night, and then I'm really interested in the street lamps. So I don't know if our light system is on a timer or if it's photosensitive, right?

Speaker 3:

Because if it's dark out for a storm. Do the lights come out?

Speaker 2:

I don't know, but the animal thing is interesting to me because for some odd reason I've been in about seven earthquakes around the world no joke, Like Taiwan, Japan, California, et cetera. And I was in the 1994 earthquake in LA and I was by myself in a dark house, Like all the lights went out in the entire city and I ran outside and the animals were going crazy. Oh yeah, I mean literally there were like raccoons running across my feet. I don't know, I couldn't see anything.

Speaker 3:

I know I couldn't see anything.

Speaker 1:

I didn't know what it was? Owls were howling. It was nuts.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, oh yeah I'm.

Speaker 3:

I'm wondering like who's going to take care of my dog, but my husband works from home but someone's got to be with the dog. And then we have friends in Argyle and she was like. You know, I should actually probably be with my horse, just in case my horse is sad.

Speaker 1:

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Speaker 1:

Well, something I read like at zoos that said that they've observed flamingos gathered in a circle around their babies to protect them. Giraffes began galloping around their enclosures. Swarms of birds suddenly like left the sky and started roosting in trees. Gorillas marched to their dens expecting their final meal of the day. Crickets started chirping. Like you said, bees go back to their hives.

Speaker 2:

And Noah's Ark shows up.

Speaker 3:

I know it's not going to rain that hard. It better not. It better not. So what you're telling me is the ideal spot to be during this eclipse is the Dallas Zoo. If you want to see weird animal behavior, yes, go to the Flamingo's over there. I want to just listen to everything.

Speaker 1:

It seems like everyone in Dallas has an event going on. They have food and drinks and they're educational, so I'm sure the zoo has not missed an opportunity.

Speaker 3:

I'm sure they haven't, but they're all booked now. I think at this point.

Speaker 1:

Oh, I know I totally dropped the ball on that, and now I want to do something and now I can't get in anywhere. Oh yeah, perot's booked Arboretum's full. I would love to be at the Arboretum. I think that would be great. Well, so for those of us in the park cities that you feel like the best vantage point to watch it.

Speaker 3:

Any street where you can have. This is hard in the park cities where there's too many trees.

Speaker 3:

And so for us just to give a little context for the middle school, their backup plan if the field is wet, because that field, if it gets wet at all, it like floods, it's a big mess. And so the backup plan is for all the students to be on high school street and see if we can block it off. And so that street I think is north, south, right, and so that would be your ideal, because the sun's going to be high noon is as a street like that, where you have the field next to it, and so there's a lot, there's a big clearing for it. Any of the parks would be a good spot because you can see really well. But if you go to your backyard and you have a bunch of really beautiful large trees, you can be thankful for them, and then also, okay, we'll have to go somewhere else. Yeah, okay.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, so probably a park Well and as we worry about the rain, honestly, it says it's going to rain all the time in Dallas and it never does, so it's quite possible that it will be just a beautiful day.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, it could be. I need to know. I have yet to look up what Pete Delpius has to say about all this. Yeah, and you know he's got something we need his expertise, that's right.

Speaker 3:

So hopefully the skies will clear up for us a little bit, and even if it is raining, you should be able to look out your window and experience that it's getting darker. And then there are live streams, I believe, where there's satellites so you can be above the cloud cover, and so, as I find those, I'll link those on the Eclipse page I have on Highland Park's website.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, Okay, I'm taking notes. I can include all these links. Yes, well, something we haven't talked about is eye safety. I remember when I was really young and an eclipse came, they told us to poke a hole in a piece of cardboard Don't look directly but now there's all this hype about the official glasses. Tell us how we need to protect our eyes.

Speaker 3:

Okay, so the official eyewear is those really weird glasses, and they block out 99% of the sun's rays, and so I went and tried them out. I hadn't actually used them before, and when you put them on, everything, literally everything is black, and so the point of that is to block enough to where you just see the sun, and so it's actually a little difficult to track the sun because you don't have anything else to look at in context, like where you're looking, and so what it does is it blocks out all the harmful rays. If you were to go out right now and make observations of the sun, you would probably want to use them, and so solar eclipse glasses are to keep your it's really your retina safe in your eyes is the price.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, but between 140 and 145, that prime time that you talked about. Do you take your glasses off?

Speaker 3:

to experience it. Great question. Yeah, you can take those off. So what NASA has put as far as sun safety is when you cannot see the sun anymore with your solar eclipse glasses, that's when it's safe to take them off.

Speaker 1:

And so yeah.

Speaker 3:

So if you're using them every couple minutes to see how much the moon has blocked out the sun and then you can't see it anymore, you'll know, and I think you should know when it hits. If it's clear, knock on wood again. Okay, yeah.

Speaker 1:

Okay, well, we will follow NASA's advice.

Speaker 3:

There we go. They seem like they know what they're doing, do you?

Speaker 1:

have any idea how photography would work. I'm trying to convince Eric Carlson, who's a dad in the neighborhood, to get out there and take some cool pictures.

Speaker 3:

Okay, so photography is actually the same thing. You can ruin your cameras, oh, really Interesting. Yes, because the sun is so powerful.

Speaker 2:

So you put glasses on it? Yeah, essentially you do.

Speaker 3:

You do put glasses on it, though, so we bought for Highlander, we bought solar filters for our cameras, and so they come in every millimeter size that you would need and you can affix them to your camera. But during totality, just like you don't have to wear your eye protection on your eyes, you don't need a filter on your camera. Okay, let me go back to this.

Speaker 2:

Where did you get those? The filters? Yeah, the solar filter, the camera filters oh, just on Amazon, really, yeah, just.

Speaker 3:

Amazon, yeah, so it's not too late. It's not too late. Prime covers a lot of time lost.

Speaker 2:

They really do. It really does. I hate to say it, but yeah, I live at Amazon. Oh, me too. Shout out to Amazon.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, so you should be able to get them in time. And same for telescopes. So you need telescopes with the filter. I bought binoculars with solar filters. I've just hyped up so much about the eclipse. I thought I should get a good view of the sunspots.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, so I have never seen the planetarium at the high school. Can you tell us about it?

Speaker 3:

Oh yeah, so we call it the Digitarium at Pierce Planetarium. I love that it's named after Donna Pierce. I know it's very sweet. That's really cool. She really is.

Speaker 3:

What established such an interest, I think, in the community, and so we have a giant projector and screen that we can run shows on, and so tomorrow, for example, we have a kindergarten group coming and they're coming to see a little show about mice in the moon and then they'll come and do an activity, a steam activity, and maps, and they, um yeah, and so we get to really use it for our schools to enjoy and also for our community.

Speaker 3:

So we have three shows this Saturday that very quickly sold out and they are all. It's filming Totality Over Texas, which is a full dome film that was made by the Houston Museum of Natural Science, I believe, and so we've we've just seen it as a big outreach for our schools and our community, and so it's been something really cool to progress into a big program where we want to bring everyone in, and so me and my counterpart who runs the show her name's Glennis Quick really started in February. I mean it's pretty recent that we brought it back up. Yeah, it's been pretty cool to see how quickly our schools have come.

Speaker 1:

Wow, well, you guys have done an excellent job. It sounds like you just have all bases covered for every school, for the community, and I love everything that you all are doing.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, thanks so much. We worked really hard.

Speaker 2:

Your enthusiasm is great it is fun. And it's kind of magic. It's fun to have somebody explain it to us. Yeah.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, it's been really fun for me too.

Speaker 1:

So I wanted to ask you about your podcast because I listened to one of the episodes the other day. I was extremely impressed and I'm super excited to tell everyone about it.

Speaker 3:

Oh yeah. So we well me started a podcast called Steamology, and the whole idea is that it's a quick way to equip our teachers and build up our teachers in everything STEAM, and so I got to have Dr Joel Myers from SMU come and join me. I've gotten to have some other teachers come join me Sam Bradbury from Region 10 was on earlier this week, and the idea is to give content knowledge so exactly what we're doing with the eclipse and then also to let teachers share the cool things they're doing and be a resource to each other. And the hard thing about teaching is you're in your room so much during the day. The hardest thing is to get out and to see what other people are doing well, and so I really wanted a place where it was easy, it wasn't extra, I'm not asking teachers to come to me after school, you can listen in your car and that they would be able to toot their own horns, because we have some teachers doing some pretty awesome things and also learn, and so that's the hope behind Steamology.

Speaker 1:

So really the audience is your fellow teachers, not necessarily the students, yeah, not necessarily students, your fellow teachers, not necessarily the students.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, not necessarily students. I was looking into students and I think it's really hard to reach those younger ones on a podcast, and so we're starting with teachers and then, if there's interest, I think we would do something for students.

Speaker 2:

Well, because it gives them a perspective on you. That's outside the classroom, you know, or, in your case, outside administration. That's right you know, and I think it would be good for them. I think so too.

Speaker 1:

So, bridget, can you tell me the difference between STEM and STEAM, Because you hear both of those terms thrown around quite a bit.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, they're used pretty interchangeably. The big difference is just that A for the arts, and there is a big reason that we added the A and big reason that we added the A and the A really has to do with the creativity that you are needed to create a lot of these STEM activities and make them steamy, and so an example would be if you're doing anything in 3D design, so that would be architecture or engineering there is an element that's needed of creativity, and so engineering. At the high school, one of the teachers is Chris Fullwood and he has a ton in his background, but really arts and so to do 3D modeling and design, you have to be able to bring in that it's structurally sound, and also we want to create things that aesthetically look nice as well and make sense, and so you're using your creativity along with that, and so the A really your creativity along with that, and so the A really plays in nicely with that.

Speaker 1:

Well, I walked around and did a little tour the other day of the maps area and I was so impressed and I saw all the 3D printers all lined up and I was just like God. I want to go back to high school.

Speaker 3:

It's a pretty creative and innovative space. They've really done a nice job of really pushing the boundaries of conventional learning and doing things that prepare for career readiness.

Speaker 2:

And that's kind of the trend now.

Speaker 3:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

It really is a trend People study different things. I mean, we're almost going to colleges, being almost like trade schools, like people are learning. A skill set that might not have been seen as valuable before and now is and, by the way, I love that you have arts in STEM. Yeah. I agree, you know because I have an art student, who's you know, studying film and he loves science.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, you know, and there's so much today when it comes to careers, where you're not just if you're doing science, you're not really just doing science, or if you're doing film, it's not just film, like there's other pieces.

Speaker 1:

Or if you're doing film, it's not just film Like there's other pieces.

Speaker 3:

You need the technology piece, you need the arts piece to be able to pull all of your skills together to do something really incredible.

Speaker 1:

And you all just recently had a science fair. Go on at the school, right?

Speaker 3:

Yes, yes we did so we had. There was this SciTech fair that occurred, and then we also had a couple of students go to the Dallas Regional Science Fair back in I want to say February, and we had one of our students, Ellie Chong. She got first in her category of biomedical engineering, creating a hydrogel that detects infection.

Speaker 3:

Wow yeah she's a freshman, oh my goodness. So it's pretty incredible that she did that. And then she qualified to go to the Texas Science Fair Texas Science and Engineering Fair which was at College Station, and she went with her teacher there and she got first place in her category again. And what that means is she qualified to go to the International Science and Engineering Fair. And where is that? That is in LA.

Speaker 2:

Okay, so that will be.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, May 11th through 17th, and so again she's doing this as a freshman. It's incredible and she's just a very distinguished young woman.

Speaker 1:

Way to go, Ellie.

Speaker 3:

Exactly.

Speaker 1:

Sending lots of positive vibes your way for May. That is so amazing Shout out to Ellie. Yeah, there we go Well so how can people find out more about the STEAM program?

Speaker 3:

Oh, that's a good question. So I've put everything. I've tried to be as open in what we're doing as possible, and so everything is on Highland Park's website. So if you go to wwwhpisdorg, slash, steam, I've got everything STEAM and then everything Eclipse related can be found there as well.

Speaker 1:

There was a lot of great information on there and I'll be sure and include a link. Thank you, well, thank you for being on the show.

Speaker 2:

It was great. You're awesome and I can't wait to listen to your podcast. Oh yeah, thank you so much for having me. Of course, that's been another episode of the. I'm Nellie Schudo.

Speaker 1:

And I'm Martha Jackson, and we'll catch you next time.

Dallas Eclipse Excitement and Safety
School Day Eclipse Preparation and Excitement
Preparing for the Solar Eclipse
STEAM Program and Podcast Discussion